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a) State your objective for the Learn it Link it direct instruction lesson; (b)

by | Apr 28, 2022 | Accounting | 0 comments

 

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a) State your objective for the Learn it Link it direct instruction lesson; (b) State your objective, standard, and focus question for your Extension activity; (c) Describe in detail what you are having your race car students do independently so that you can work with your hiker students. (You do not have to describe what you are doing with your hiker learners.) In your description, include the directions you have written, screenshots of what you are using, links to resources, exemplars you have made, and so forth. Do not include attachments. In order to upload pictures directly to the body of a post, check the box that says, “This is decorative.” Attachments will not be looked at and therefore not graded. Remember this is an extension activity; they already have demonstrated that they know what you have taught them. Your extension activity is for them to add to that foundation NOT to give them additional practice with the same material Writes a substantial post, including a detailed description of your extension activity. Includes (1) objective for the Learn it Link it direct instruction lesson, (2) objective, standard, and focus question for your Extension activity, (3) detailed description of what you are having your race car students do independently so that you can work with your hiker students. In your description, you have included the directions you have written, screenshots of what you are using, links to resources, exemplars you have made, and so forth. You did NOT include attachments and DID include everything in the body of your post. Lesson plan: Start with the end in mind—the finish line. (1.a.) What is it that you want your students to know, understand, or be able to do? Do you want your students to be able to provide and explain examples of how government provides (or doesn’t provide) for the needs of its people? Do you want your students to be able to complete a story map detailing the rising action, climax, conflict, falling action, and resolution for a given story? Do you want your students to be able to create a food web to demonstrate their understanding of how plants, animals, and energy resources interact? Do you want your students to be able to determine how to solve a quadratic equation? Be specific. This statement becomes your instructional objective. There are 3 parts to your instructional objective. Be sure to include each part. (A) Audience: Who are your learners? Are they 2nd grade math students? 8th grade foreign language students? 12th grade calculus students? College sophomores studying economics? (B) Behavior: What is it you want them to know, understand, or be able to do? Choose your verbs wisely. Being able to identify the stages of the water cycle is much easier than explaining each stage and how they interconnect. Strive for rigor. Remember, with your guided practice, students will be able to achieve more than you might think they are capable of at first. (C) Criterion: What is the level of competence that must be reached? When you think criteria, think measurement and assessment. Is it a 1-minute think-aloud where students record themselves explaining the series of steps they used to find a solution? Is a timeline with at least 8 significant events? (1.a.) A-B-C objective: Fifth-grade science students to be able to explain the digestive system including how it works, location of different organs that are involved, and their function in at least 6 coherent sentences. (Part 1.b.) Turn your instructional objective—that is what you want your students to know, understand or be able to do—into a focus question. Why a focus question? Because answering questions lie at the heart of active learning. Focus questions are asked at the start of the lesson to focus the instruction and are referred to as instruction unfolds to help students (and you) remain laser-focused on accomplishing the objective. Good questions stimulate spurts of dopamine that draw in students’ attention. Answering the question interrupts forgetting and strengthens the new learning. At the end of the lesson, when students can answer the focus question on their own, you’ll have a good indication that they mastered the material. Focus questions should be straight-forward, grammatically correct, and use student-friendly language. (1.b.) Focus Question: How does the body digest the food that we eat? Learn it Lesson Body ROUND 1 (2.a.) Round 1: I do—Teacher presentation of material How will you explicitly explain to your students what you want them to know, understand and be able to do? Think about the information, examples, and demonstrations that will make learning clear and meaningful. Instruction needs to be segmented so as not to overwhelm students’ working memory capacity and to give Hip a chance to offload information to Neo. Generally, each segment of explicit instruction is 5-7 minutes long depending on your learners. The first segment of instruction (Round 1) is typically foundational knowledge and key vocabulary. Each subsequent segment (Round 2+) adds another segment of information and complexity. How will you segment your information? Two segments are required. Considerations as you plan your presentation of material: • What multimedia might enhance your presentation? Multimedia instruction can be generalized to any lesson containing both words and pictures. The words can be in spoken or printed form, and the pictures can be in static form (such as illustrations, charts, graphs, or photos) or dynamic form (such as animation or video; Mayer, 2019). • How will you assist students’ notetaking? For more experienced learners cues may be enough, but our novice learners will likely benefit from more structured support like a skeleton outline or graphic organizer to be completed as your instruction unfolds. (2.a.) Round 1: I do—Teacher Presentation of Material: Foundational Knowledge = the parts of the digestive system 1. Students read the following sections from their science textbook in pairs: What is digestion? Digestive system organs. The reading identifies all components of the digestive system and their functions. It includes a figure of the digestive system. Textbook Citation: Smith, M. E., & Morton, D. G. (2011). The Digestive System: Systems of the Body Series. Elsevier Health Sciences. https://www.sciencedirect.com/book/9780702033674/the-digestive-system#book-info 2. I explain the location in the body and function of each part of the digestive system using a PowerPoint slide show that includes the correct spelling of all parts, a student-friendly definition, and an image of each part. 3. Notetaking: Students create a flashcard for each of the digestive system organs to include the component (spelled correctly) on one side and its drawing and function on the other side. (2.b.) Round 1: We do—Guided retrieval practice After each segment of explicit instruction, ask yourself: What skills and concepts do I want my students to practice under my watchful eye? Then ask yourself, how can I have my students practice retrieving this new knowledge or skill? Remember, variety is the spice of life and the brain craves novelty. Thus, take a novel approach to creating practice for your students. Some of my favorite examples of retrieval practice like think-pair-share, whip around, or a 1-sentence summary, may not give students enough practice. As such, you may consider pairing these strategies with one another. For example, after a think-write-pair-share, you may wish to conduct a whip around for students to hear their classmates’ responses. During this practice stage—where students are wrestling with the new information—it can be motivating for students if you have them work with a partner to quiz each other, bounce ideas off one another, and support each other. (2.b.) Round 1: We do—Guided Retrieval Practice: Round 1: Foundational Knowledge: The digestive system organs and their functions I want my students to practice the organs of the digestive system and their functions. Therefore, I will ask them to practice using their flashcards individually then in pairs until they achieve 100% accuracy. Besides, I will have them quiz each other using pen and paper. Student A will give student B an organ. Student B will then draw that organ and provide its function in the digestion process. (2.c.) Round 1: You do—Students demonstrate mastery on their own How will you have your students independently demonstrate their learning? Success often begets more success. Allowing students the opportunity to experience small wins along their way to mastering the objective can serve as a motivator to get them to the finish line. But there is no fun in having students do the same ol’ same ol’. Once students have had plenty of retrieval practice, test their understanding of the same information they have practiced, but in novel ways. Include at least one method of assessment—that way students can prove to themselves and you that they understand, know, or are able to do—the content or skill for each segment of instruction. (2.c.) Round 1: You do—Students Demonstrate Mastery on Their Own: Round 1: Foundational Knowledge: The digestive system organs and their functions Students will be given a blank diagram of the digestive system. They will label each organ and provide its function. ROUND 2 (3.a.) Round 2: I do—Teacher presentation of material Now that you have created a foundation of knowledge and key vocabulary to build from, what more will you add to it? How will you explicitly explain this additional layer of information and complexity to your students? What is it that you want them to know, understand and be able to do after Round 2 of instruction (I do)? Think about the information, examples, and demonstrations that will make learning clear and meaningful. Instruction needs to be segmented so as not to overwhelm students’ working memory capacity and to give Hip a chance to offload information to Neo. Generally, each segment of explicit instruction is 5-7 minutes long depending on your learners. Considerations as you plan your presentation of material: • What multimedia might enhance your presentation? Multimedia instruction can be generalized to any lesson containing both words and pictures. The words can be in spoken or printed form, and the pictures can be in static form (such as illustrations, charts, graphs, or photos) or dynamic form (such as animation or video; Mayer, 2019). • How will you assist students’ notetaking? For more experienced learners cues may be enough, but our novice learners will likely benefit from more structured support like a skeleton outline or graphic organizer to be completed as your instruction unfolds. (3.a.) Round 2: I do—Teacher Presentation of Material: Round 2: Conceptual Understanding = The digestive system function 1. Students view a video clip showing the process of digestion. VIDEO LENGTH: 108 seconds. Their purpose for watching the video is to be able to answer the following Guiding question for viewing: How does the body digest the food that we eat? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-n_Q0qKXzg • Video shows how food moves from the mouth to the intestines. • Video shows major organs in the digestive system and how they work together to convert food into nutrients for use by the body. 2. Following along with the teacher, students create a 2-D model of the digestive system with a partner. Materials needed include tubing, colored paper, markers, adhesive material, clean plastic bottles, images or organs, jelly beans, and clay. 3. . Example of the finished project: 4. (3.b.) Round 2: We do—Guided retrieval practice After Round 2 of explicit instruction (I do), ask yourself: What skills and concepts do I want my students to practice under my watchful eye? Then ask yourself, how can I have my students practice retrieving this new knowledge or skill? Remember, variety is the spice of life and the brain craves novelty. Thus, take a novel approach to creating practice for your students. Do something different than what you did in Round 1: We do or Round 1: You do. And don’t forget, some examples of retrieval practice like think-pair-share, whip around, or a 1-sentence summary, may not give students enough practice, especially as the material increases in difficulty. As such, consider pairing strategies with one another. And remember, during We do, it can be super motivating for students to work with a partner to quiz each other, bounce ideas off one another, and support each other. (3.b.) Round 2: We do—Guided Retrieval Practice: I want my students to fluently explain how food moves from the mouth through the digestive system to the rest of the body. Besides, they should demonstrate how the model of the digestive system helped them to better understand the concept of digestion. To do so, I will ask my students to work in pairs and create a video that explains the model and how it helped them to understand the process of digestion. (3.c.) Round 2: You do—Students demonstrate mastery on their own How will you have your students independently demonstrate their new learning? Round 2: You do assesses the new information and skills taught and practiced during Round 2 of instruction (Round 2: I do, Round 2: We do) Remember, there is no fun in having students do the same ol’ same ol’. Test their understanding of the new information and skills they have learned and practiced in Round 2, but in novel ways. (3.c.) Round 2: You do—Students Demonstrate Mastery on Their Own: Students will compose a well-written paragraph that answers the lesson’s focus question. How does the body digest the food that you eat? The students will include the terms mouth, the salivary glands, the esophagus, peristalsis, the stomach, enzymes, hydrochloric acid, the duodenum, the small intestine, the large intestine, and the rectum. Expected student response: In the mouth, the salivary glands secrete saliva that digest carbohydrates. After I have chewed food, I push it to the back of my mouth with my tongue. The epiglottis closes off the trachea, the tube leading to the lungs. This prevents food from going down the trachea. Instead, it moves down the esophagus, towards the stomach. The esophagus is surrounded by layers of muscles that squeeze food downwards towards the stomach. The steady contraction and relaxation of these muscles are known as peristalsis. The stomach is also wrapped in layers of muscles that contract and relax to mix food with hydrochloric acid that kills germs and enzymes that digest proteins. Further digestion continues in the duodenum. Digested food is absorbed in the small intestine. The large intestine absorbs water. Undigested materials are stored in the rectum. This is how the digestive system h

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