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This essay should focus exclusively on the questions from the statement of belie

by | Apr 28, 2022 | Ethics | 0 comments

 

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This essay should focus exclusively on the questions from the statement of belief essay. Ethics is not about studying various theories in order to pass tests. The goal of ethics (according to Aristotle) is to make us good. This is not to say that you were evil before this class, or that this class will make you into a good person per se. What this assignment aims to do is to have you begin to think critically about yourself, your beliefs, why your beliefs are what they are, how those beliefs impact the kind of person you are, and whether or not you are happy with who that person is. If none of your beliefs have been affected by the content of this course, you should pinch yourself: how likely is it that you’ve come to the right conclusions on all of the subjects we’ve covered before having subjected your beliefs to the careful rational scrutiny that has been the method of this course? This paper forces you to challenge yourself and your previous beliefs, and to subject yourself to the kind of scrutiny necessary to become a more genuinely rational thinker on ethical issues. Choose 3 questions from the statement of belief essay for further inquiry. Pick the ones that were either most interesting to you, the ones you felt you’ve changed your opinion on, or the ones you feel most strongly convicted of. Most especially, pick the ones that are causing you anxiety or worry. This is a natural reaction when your deeply held beliefs are challenged. Introduction, 1 paragraph Once you’ve chosen your issues, restate briefly what your beliefs were concerning those issues at the outset of the course. Don’t quote your statement of belief essay directly, instead try to capture the essence of those answers in the briefest possible summation. You should make mention of only the most relevant autobiographical details that shaped your moral worldview, before the beginning of this course, by way of explanation. Subjecting your specific ethical beliefs to an interrogation, 3–6 paragraphs total Then, devote 1–2 paragraphs to each of the three themes you’ve selected to articulate how those beliefs have been impacted by the arguments of the course, either positively or negatively. This will require the recapitulation of the arguments in the course that either changed your position, or that you had to refute. If your belief changed, which arguments convinced you? And if your opinion has stayed the same, explain why the arguments opposed to your view failed to persuade you, and which arguments convince you that you are right. Defending a coherent position First, assess your set of claims for consistency. If you find inconsistencies, rectify them by either changing one of your beliefs, or explaining how an apparent inconsistency is not a true inconsistency. 1–2 paragraphs Next, defend your convictions, whatever they are, against objections. This will require some additional research on your part. Find at least one article that disagrees with your position for each claim you are defending (i.e. three articles total) and argue against your detractors. Use logic and reasoning to show how your opponent’s arguments are invalid, unsound, fallacious, incomplete, or inconclusive. 6–9 paragraphs. Assess the impact of your additional research. Did consideration of their arguments impact your beliefs at all? How confident are you in your position? What additional things might you need to learn about in order to strengthen the convictions you are defending in this paper? 1–2 Paragraphs 12–20 paragraphs total, or no more than 10 pages. Format: No cover page, Times New Roman, 12 pt. font, 1 inch margins, double spaced, works cited, MLA, APA, and Chicago format are all acceptable, use in-text citations, make references as specific as possible including page number, citations from our textbook should be to the specific articles you cite, not to the textbook as a whole, staple all pages, name in header of all pages, page numbers in footer. Grading Rubric for the self-examination essay: A: the paper meets every stipulation in this essay prompt, exhibits mastery of the material covered, is introspective and thoughtful, with flawless writing, organization, and formatting. C: the paper satisfies every requirement in the prompt but does so ineloquently, with only a satisfactory grasp of the material covered, the organization is lacking, writing contains mistakes, and formatting is not exactly as specified below. F: the paper fails to meet all of the stipulations in the above prompt, or exhibits unsatisfactory understanding of the material, or lack of proper organization renders the writing difficult to follow, or the writing is riddled with mistakes. The structure of your paper should look like this, in order: Introduction Subjecting your specific ethical beliefs to an interrogation, Issue 1 Defense of your Position, Issue 1 Subjecting your specific ethical beliefs to an interrogation, Issue 2 Defense of your Position, Issue 2 Subjecting your specific ethical beliefs to an interrogation, Issue 3 Defense of your Position, Issue 3 Coherence Check Conclusion Guide to peer to peer review: 1. Is the paper organized in a way that makes the argument and thesis of the author clear and easy to follow? 2. Is the thesis stated clearly, and supported throughout the paper? 3. Is the author’s exegesis of the texts they discuss accurate, charitable, and relevant? That is, do they summarize only those parts that are necessary for the articulation of their thesis, or do they use textual exegesis as a crutch to avoid having to make arguments? 4. Evaluate the authors arguments. Are they valid? Are they sound? Do they persuade the reader? 5. Does the author give a fair hearing to the view that disagrees with their own? In other words, do they make a steel man or a straw man of their opponent? 6. Do they successfully respond to their critic? (assuming they gave a fair hearing to the other side or sides of the argument) 7. Is it clear where the authors thoughts end and the authors he cites thoughts’ begin? 8. Are sources notated and referenced correctly? One way to figure this out is to ask: “would I be easily able to go look up the sources the author cites?” 9. How is the author’s writing? Grammar? Syntax? Vocabulary? Etc. 10. This list is not exhaustive, let the author know of any other problems or recommendations you think will help them improve the paper. my statement of believe questionare where you have to choose 3 questions from Is it possible to make arguments about ethical issues which lead to conclusions that ought to be accepted by any rational person? Yes, one can make an argument about ethical issues. One will argue if something is ethical and if they believe in it. Its more of a debate for me. 2. Is the pursuit of pleasure the most important deciding factor in the decisions that you make? Should it be? No, I would say that the beneficial outcome should be the most important factor in the decision that one makes. When making a decision it should be based on is it beneficial for you and your family, what is it going to bring to the table. It should not be just based on pleasure 3. Is getting what you want always a good thing? Why or why not? Getting what you want is not always a good thing because sometimes what you want is really not what you need. For example, you have 20 purses, and you want a Michael Kors purse you saw, you saw it, now you want it, but you do not need it, nor will it affect you in any way. So, wanting something does not necessarily mean you need it and is good for you. 4. Are human beings necessarily selfish, or is altruism possible? On the most part I believe humans are selfish, not necessarily because they do it on purpose but because they believe they need more when they really do not. We have a place to live, we have family and friends, and we have food to eat and a job to go to. Yes, it is probably not the best or you dream of more but if we look at the people that do not have anything then we are selfish because the minimal we have somebody else wish they had. 5. Are all moral claims true so long as someone believes them? Or, on the other hand, are some moral claims universally true for everyone regardless of what they believe? I believe moral claims are true for everyone, everyone believes in them from a different perspective. I could have my opinion on it, but it does not mean your moral opinions and values don’t count. I do believe moral claims universally are true for everyone. No matter what you believe in them. 6. Are there such things as absolute duties? In other words, are there any things we must never do, or must always do? I would say yes there are such things as absolute duties, because when you have kids and family it is your absolute duty to make sure they are in good health and condition. You have to maintain your living space and make sure your kids’ hygiene is done and watched over. If you are not on top of your kids and family then literally everything falls apart. 7. Mother always said to think about the consequences of your actions before you act. Are the consequences of our actions the only morally relevant consideration? On the other hand, are they relevant at all? No, I do not think the consequences of our actions are the only morally relevant consideration. I think all the decisions we make in life have a moral relevant consideration no matter if it’s right or wrong. 8. Since universal laws seem to require a universal lawmaker, could anything be truly good if God did not exist? For me nothing would be truly good if God did not exist. God has control of everything the good the bad, anything that happens happens for a reason and God always has a purpose for everything. 9. Do things in nature have a natural purpose or end towards which their activity aims? If so, does this give us a guide to the right action? I believe things in nature do have a natural purpose. I am a great believer that things happen for a reason. Even if you do not think so at that very moment in time, in the long run you will look back and say oh okay I see why now. 10. Is human nature sufficiently universal that we would expect any group of humans to develop a society that shares a few basic moral principles in common with any other society of humans, no matter how far separated by time, space, or culture? I would say so, human nature comes naturally, and no matter what group of humans it would automatically kick in right or wrong. 11. Is it possible for a person who lacks virtue to be good? For example, if a spouse refrains from extramarital affairs, but desperately desires to have them (and thus lacks the virtue of chastity), are their acts of devotion truly, right? I would say no for me if there’s thoughts and desire to be with someone else then they are not devoted to their spouse. They should not even be having a desperate desire to be with another woman. 12. Are traditional rules of morality, e.g. “Take responsibility for your actions,” inherently oppressive towards women? (I am not asking about old social norms, e.g. “It’s more natural for women to be homemakers than breadwinners.”) Do women (and men) need a new kind of ethics, free from patriarchal influence? Yes, because I feel that women can be both homemakers and breadwinners. Womens are smart and are capable of working and doing anything they put their mind and heart to. I do think there should be a new kind of ethics for this, so it won’t be so against womenIs it possible to make arguments about ethical issues which lead to conclusions that ought to be accepted by any rational person? Yes, one can make an argument about ethical issues. One will argue if something is ethical and if they believe in it. Its more of a debate for me. 2. Is the pursuit of pleasure the most important deciding factor in the decisions that you make? Should it be? No, I would say that the beneficial outcome should be the most important factor in the decision that one makes. When making a decision it should be based on is it beneficial for you and your family, what is it going to bring to the table. It should not be just based on pleasure 3. Is getting what you want always a good thing? Why or why not? Getting what you want is not always a good thing because sometimes what you want is really not what you need. For example, you have 20 purses, and you want a Michael Kors purse you saw, you saw it, now you want it, but you do not need it, nor will it affect you in any way. So, wanting something does not necessarily mean you need it and is good for you. 4. Are human beings necessarily selfish, or is altruism possible? On the most part I believe humans are selfish, not necessarily because they do it on purpose but because they believe they need more when they really do not. We have a place to live, we have family and friends, and we have food to eat and a job to go to. Yes, it is probably not the best or you dream of more but if we look at the people that do not have anything then we are selfish because the minimal we have somebody else wish they had. 5. Are all moral claims true so long as someone believes them? Or, on the other hand, are some moral claims universally true for everyone regardless of what they believe? I believe moral claims are true for everyone, everyone believes in them from a different perspective. I could have my opinion on it, but it does not mean your moral opinions and values don’t count. I do believe moral claims universally are true for everyone. No matter what you believe in them. 6. Are there such things as absolute duties? In other words, are there any things we must never do, or must always do? I would say yes there are such things as absolute duties, because when you have kids and family it is your absolute duty to make sure they are in good health and condition. You have to maintain your living space and make sure your kids’ hygiene is done and watched over. If you are not on top of your kids and family then literally everything falls apart. 7. Mother always said to think about the consequences of your actions before you act. Are the consequences of our actions the only morally relevant consideration? On the other hand, are they relevant at all? No, I do not think the consequences of our actions are the only morally relevant consideration. I think all the decisions we make in life have a moral relevant consideration no matter if it’s right or wrong. 8. Since universal laws seem to require a universal lawmaker, could anything be truly good if God did not exist? For me nothing would be truly good if God did not exist. God has control of everything the good the bad, anything that happens happens fo

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