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Using at least two of the texts we’ve read in class this quarter, develop a work

by | Jun 19, 2022 | English | 0 comments

 

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Using at least two of the texts we’ve read in class this quarter, develop a working hypothesis (also called a working thesis) of your own. This should be a new idea not already stated in the texts that comes from your own insight. Use quotes, examples, and ideas from the texts and your own personal experience to “test out” and revise your hypothesis. Show the process of your initial ideas, how they are challenged, and how you came to a new version of your thesis/hypothesis. In other words, take your readers on a thinking process where you show them your initial ideas, how you’ve chosen to test them out, and finally, what firmer conclusions you can arrive at at the end of your process.
< Write at least 1500-2000 words < Develop an insight/ discovery of your own < Organize your writing around the process of your thinking and testing out of your idea. < Introduce and summarize key ideas from texts to create context for your readers < Demonstrate your ability to evolve a thesis < Use MLA formatting and citation < <
Directions: Breaking it Down into Steps
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This essay is interested in both the process you go through to write and the product it creates in the end.
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Write using a “working thesis.” This might be a question, a working hypothesis that you are testing out—but the important part is that your, points, conclusions and ideas are tentative until you test them out.
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Introduce a working thesis statement early in your essay. Show that your ideas are tentative by using hedging/ qualifying words. It might sound something like this:
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X and Y may indicate that _____. One possible answer is ________. It could be that­­­­­_________.
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although most readers of _______ have argued that _______, closer examination seems to show that _______.
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_______ uses _______ and _____ to could prove that ________.
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phenomenon X might be a result of ­­_______.
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Predict a possible outcome. What is likely to be true about your hypothesis and why? The introduction of your essay is a great place to do such predictions.
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Determine how you will test out your hypothesis. In the sciences and social sciences you might devise a formal experiment in a controlled setting. In the humanities, like for English class, “testing out” ideas means doing analysis:
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Comparing your idea to others’ ideas to see if they are similar. A pattern of shared insight can indicate a level of proof.
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Asking questions.
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Answering questions.
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Making the implicit explicit
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Looking at examples that support your hypothesis. Explain how and why.
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Looking at examples that seem to refute or challenge your hypothesis. Explain how, and why. If you find an example that challenges your hypothesis, you MUST revise your hypothesis to account for it.
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A key component of this assignment is you showing that you are able to revise a thesis/ hypothesis in light of the specific evidence you’ve brought to your essay. This means showing readers where you’ve changed your hypothesis. It might look like this
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Showing the limitations of your hypothesis: What we can’t know for sure is ________. That means we can only claim ________.
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Qualifying your claim. It might mean explaining exceptions to the rule: X does occur, as a I originally though, but only in ________ situations and NOT in _______ situations.
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Compare your original predictions with your final conclusions. What changed and why? What didn’t and why? Keep in mind that the goal here isn’t to be right all along, but to really try and come to a deeper understanding of your hypothesis.
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Consider the implications of your revised hypothesis. What difference does it make to know this idea? What difference does it make to have revised this idea? Who might care? Why might your idea matter?
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What additional testing out, research or information might be needed to gain an even deeper understanding of your hypothesis/ thesis?
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Directions for Writer’s Memo
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Once you have completed your essay, spend some time reflecting on the assignment and how it went, what it’s goals were, and how you did. Type up your thoughts in a 1-2 page Writer’s Memo, double spaced. In your memo, reflect on at least 3-4 of the following points:
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What inspired your topic choice? What was most important thing you realized/ learned about your topic?
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What previous knowledge did you bring to the writing of this essay? How do you think it helped or hindered you?
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How well did your writing meeting the assignment requirements in the grading rubric? Talk about why you think you did well or why you struggled with specific criteria on the rubric.
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What did your writing process entail? What strategies did you use? Would you use them again? What might you try differently next time? What was hardest? Easiest?
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What are your strengths and weaknesses in the essay, as a writer?
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What do you think this assignment was asking you to learn about writing? What did you learn?
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How did this assignment contribute to your understanding of academic writing?
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How might analysis, like you were asked to do for this essay, be applicable to other writing situations?

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