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Think of this as your “read receipt” for the assigned material. This activity wi

by | Nov 24, 2022 | Culture and Ethnic Studies | 0 comments

 

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Think of this as your “read receipt” for the assigned material.
This activity will provide you with the opportunity to practice generating a useful academic resource that demonstrates your engagement with scholarly research on race – the annotated bibliography. This tool is useful for articulating your understanding of secondary sources, highlighting key ideas, and evaluating the resource in a concise and coherent way. Annotated bibliographies are useful tools that support other modes of production such as research articles, policy reports, museum exhibits, media production, speeches and presentations, social movements and activism, as well as the arts and humanities.
Please create an annotated bibliography for the following readings:
These readings have been previously assigned and are located in the modules.
Alamillo, J. M. (2000). Bitter-sweet communities: Mexican workers and citrus growers on the California landscape, 1880–1941. In Embry, J. L. (Ed.). (2013). Oral History, Community, and Work in the American West. University of Arizona Press.Download Alamillo, J. M. (2000). Bitter-sweet communities: Mexican workers and citrus growers on the California landscape, 1880–1941. In Embry, J. L. (Ed.). (2013). Oral History, Community, and Work in the American West. University of Arizona Press.
Norkunas, M. (2019). Teaching to listen: Listening exercises and self-reflexive journals. The Oral History Review.Download Norkunas, M. (2019). Teaching to listen: Listening exercises and self-reflexive journals. The Oral History Review.
Parts of an Annotated Bibliography (taken from Purdue OWL Links to an external site.)
Your annotated bibliography should include four elements: the citation, a summary, an assessment, and a personal reflection. Click the link above (Purdue) for more information about annotated bibliographies.
Citation: A list of the elements that reference a work (book, article, etc.), that may include the title of the work, the author/editor, publisher, date published, volume, issue, and, if from the internet or a database, the url or doi Links to an external site..
Summary: Some annotations merely summarize the source. What are the main arguments? What is the point of this book or article? What topics are covered? If someone asked what this article/book is about, what would you say? The length of your annotations will determine how detailed your summary is.
Assessment: After summarizing a source, briefly evaluate it. Is it a useful source for understanding race, ethnicity, racism, immigration etc.? Explain.
Reflection: Once you’ve summarized and assessed a source, you need to ask how it fits into your thinking. How does it help you shape your thinking about race, place, and identity? Has it changed how you think about these topics? Explain. Any other thoughts?
Expectations
Each annotation should be around 300 words, 12 point font in one document. Please list them in alphabetical order as I’ve arranged them above. You can use APA, MLA, or Chicago styles of format. You can either enter it directly in the text box or upload a document in either doc/docx or pdf formats only.
Here are some samples of what an annotated bibliography entry should look like from the Online Writing Lab at Purdue University Links to an external site..

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